UMEM Educational Pearls

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Putting the 'Omph' in Omphalitis

Keywords: Pediatrics, infections, neonatal (PubMed Search)

Posted: 5/5/2023 by Rachel Wiltjer, DO (Updated: 5/27/2024)
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Neonatal rashes are common and, usually, benign. There are some skin findings, however, that require early recognition and treatment for best outcomes. One of these concerning etiologies is omphalitis, infection of the umbilical stump and surrounding tissues.

Features of omphalitis may include erythema and induration around the umbilicus, purulent drainage, and potentially systemic illness.

Risk factors include poor cord hygiene, premature or prolonged rupture of membranes, maternal infection, low birth weight, umbilical catheterization, and home birth.

Evaluation includes surface cultures from the site of infection as well as age-appropriate fever workup if patient is febrile. Consider ultrasound to evaluate for urachal anomalies as these can co-exist.

Management is IV antibiotics to cover S. aureus and gram negatives with surgical consultation if there are signs of necrotizing fasciitis or abscess. Some newer literature suggests that patients with omphalitis seen and treated in high-income countries may not be as sick as previously thought (as most data has been obtained in lower income countries where incidence is higher) and there has been a suggestion that there may be a role for oral antibiotics in well appearing, lower risk infants. This deserves further exploration but cannot yet be considered standard of care.

Other umbilical cord findings to consider (when it isn’t omphalitis): patent urachus, granuloma, local irritation, or partial cord separation

References

Kaplan RL. Omphalitis: Clinical Presentation and Approach to Evaluation and Management. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2023;39(3):188-189.