UMEM Educational Pearls

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Passive Leg Raise in Children

Keywords: Passive leg raise, hypotension (PubMed Search)

Posted: 2/21/2014 by Jenny Guyther, MD (Updated: 9/27/2022)
Click here to contact Jenny Guyther, MD

Passive leg raise (PLR) has been studied in adults as a bedside tool to predict volume responsiveness (see previous pearls from 5/7/13 and 6/17/2008). Can this be applied to children?
 
A single center prospective study looked at 40 intensive care patients ranging in age from 1 month to 12.5 years.  They used a noninvasive monitoring system that could measure heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output.  These parameters were measured at a baseline, after PLR, after another baseline and after a 10 ml/kg bolus.
 
Overall, changes in the cardiac index varied with PLR.  However, there was a statistically significant correlation in children over 5 years showing an increase in cardiac index with PLR and with a fluid bolus.
 
Bottom line:  In children older then 5 years, PLR can be a quick bedside tool to assess for fluid responsiveness, especially if worried about fluid overload and in an under served area.

References

Lu et al.  The Passive Leg Raise Test to Predict Fluid Responsiveness in Children - Preliminary Observations.  Indian J Pediatr.  Dec 2013. (epub ahead of print).